City Living in Solitude

On a recent trip through a city, I realized something about me and people that live in the city center’s. “City people want to live alone but are afraid of the solitude.” Let me explain, in the city we move about our day and when returning home rush to get inside. Is this to avoid more human contact with the neighbor’s? I think so! All of the movement and action in a city allows one to be alone in a crowd, in a crowd one is not noticed like in a rural setting. In rural settings every move is noticed because so few exist. So we are more exposed. In the city we can move about barely noticed and live alone in large groups.

I moved away from the city 7 years ago and I realized this fact only last week. Now that I have experienced what true solitude is, I can not say I would ever live in that loneliness of the city again. It is dark and without feeling. The solitude of the middle of nowhere is like music, it is loud with life and peace at the same time. Your soul speaks and the people you have contact with are or seem more genuine.

If you live in the city…travel to a remote place and spend more than one day in this setting, and if you live in rural area go to the city and also stay for more than a day and observe what you see and feel. Then you may agree with my new mantra “City people want to live alone but are afraid of the solitude.”Storms

Spring Snow Travel

It is here! Spring Snow and wet roads make for slow travel. However early risers get the fresh powder. And for those of us which use snow shoveling for therapy out early with the snow removal equipment “a shovel”12036669_1049792005066299_5454788957978697424_n.Spring Snow TravelStay with us! Visit SouthEastern Wyoming

Winter Wyoming Traveling

At times it can be very slow moving or stopped due to road closures. Wind in the Winter is even higher, it can gust up to 75mph, in the east this is called a hurricane. We that live in Wyoming learn to plan trips to town around the weather.

If you are a winter sports activist then driving in extreme Winter conditions is a task required to enjoy your activity. Although tough at times the roads, once you arrive to your destination in the mountains, the pain of Wyoming Winter Travel goes away quickly.


Christmas Tree Hunting

I am 54 and for the first time in my life, I went to the forest to hunt our tree. Mostly for the Christmas in Centennial Celebration, but also for my In-Laws coming for the Holiday’s. I am not a big Christmas celebrator, however it always reminds me of my Mother.

So out to the Medicine Bow National Forest with our tree permit in tow. We drive up about 6 miles from our Hotel and find a spot along the road to park, then gather the tools needed a saw, an axe and a camera. We begin the trek in (you must be at least 500′ from the road). Only 5 minutes in a we find the gem. As I start to chop the tree a feeling of peace comes over me. The sound of the silent forest, the crisp air and thoughts of days gone by(Mom). It was really surreal and serene, with a hint of nostalgic folklore. I was raised in the inner city and we always just went to the lot up the street to get a tree, this was like a whole new world. Out in the forest with the forest spirits and my wonderful wife(with Mom over watching). The tree falls to the forest floor or blanketed  snow covering. Handing the tools off, I grab the trunk and start to drag up the hill and then down back to the road. This task also brings feelings of accomplishment and nostalgia. On the road we load the tree in the truck and head back to trim and put up the tree. With a nice cup of Hot Chocolate.


I highly recommend Christmas Tree Hunting in the forest.